Online Safety

Technology and the internet are part of our daily lives. It’s almost impossible for children to avoid coming into contact with the online world. From social media apps to messaging services to online gaming, it’s important that we, as trusted adults, help to protect children from harm. But it’s just as important that they too know how to respond to online dangers.

National Online Safety

That’s why we’ve created this useful guide for children outlining various online safety do’s and don’ts to help empower them to make the right decisions when interacting with the online world.

Online-Safety-Tips-for-Children.pdf

CEOP

The NCA's CEOP Command (formerly the Child Exploitation and Online Protection Centre) works with child protection partners across the UK and abroad.

For advice, help, and support use Click CEOP

CEOP - Thinkuknow

Guide to internet safety and safe surfing for young people from Think U Know. They have areas for :

Ages 4 to 7

Ages 8 to 10

Parents & Carers

Your guide to social networks your children use. Stay up to date and keep your child safe in today's digital world.

The trained Childline counsellors are there for young people 24 hours a day, every day of the year.

Talking to Childline can be the first step that gets a child's life back on track. And young people can get help and support with any issue they're going through, no matter how big or small.


WhatsApp

WhatsApp

As of May 2018, WhatsApp's minimum age of use is 16 years old if you live in the European Union, or a country that has adopted the GDPR, as the UK has. It was previously 13 and WhatsApp has not yet said what will happen to users between 13 and 16 who already held accounts under the old terms and conditions.

Help your child think about what they share online and who sees it. Compare it to what they would be happy to share offline. Use examples that are easy for them to understand: “You shouldn't give your number to somebody you don't know on the street. Is somebody online you don't know any different?”

New Devices

New Devices

The current generation are the first children to grow up in a world where digital devices are the norm. The guide takes a look at a number of tips such as how to turn location settings off, how to discourage device dependency and how to set up parental controls.


TikTok Information for Parents.pdf

TikTok

TikTok is a video-sharing social media app which lets people create, view and download looping 15-second clips. Typically, these are videos of users lip-syncing and dancing to popular songs or soundbites (often for comic purposes), enhanced with filters, effects and text. Designed with young people in mind, TikTok skyrocketed in popularity in 2019 and has featured near the top of download charts ever since. It now has around 1 billion active users worldwide.

In the guide, you'll find tips on a number of potential risks such as age-inappropriate content, addiction and in-app spending.



Netflix information for Parents.pdf

Netflix

Netflix is a subscription-based streaming service that allows users to watch TV shows and movies on any internet-enabled device that supports the software, such as smart TVs, phones and tablets. The pandemic saw a surge in children consuming on-demand content as many families relaxed their screen-time rules. Netflix’s diverse range of programming caters for all age groups – so it’s important for parents to recognise the potential risks of children using the service and the measures to help their child enjoy a safe streaming experience.

In the guide, you'll find tips on a number of potential risks such as screen addiction, inappropriate content and hacking attempts.




Share Kindness Online.pdf

10 ways to share kindness online

A free online safety guide on sharing kindness online.

Last year, around one in five children aged 10–15 in England and Wales admitted experiencing online bullying: most commonly being insulted or sworn at, or having hurtful messages sent about them. To a child who’s being bullied, the world can seem like a bleak, negative place – but just one kind word can be a ray of hope: a turning point that brightens someone’s day and resets their perspective. That’s why ‘One Kind Word’ is the theme of Anti-Bullying Week 2021. We’re supporting this year’s event by bringing you ten top tips for beating online bullying by replacing it with kindness.

In the guide, you'll find tips such as reaching out, thinking before commenting and recommending fun things.